Part 5: Creating a Critter from My Mind

Painting from your imagination provides opportunities to experiment with different techniques. Most experiments are a dismal failure, but some result in happy accidents. When you are happy with an experiment, you have learned a new technique to add to your repertoire of skills.

My favorite brush for painting fur/feathers is a script liner – especially for simultaneously painting both texture and form. The critter’s forehead appears to be both furry and three dimensional. An under-painting of the beak establishes form with several values of pink/red.

Tip: Never place a script liner brush (or other soft brush) sitting on its hairs in a container of water. If the hairs become permanently curved, the brush is ruined. Also, avoid soap that contains oil or moisturizer – oil and acrylics don’t mix (just as oil and water don’t mix).

5

Part 1: Creating a Critter from My Mind

On a personal note, I started this painting over two years ago but encountered additional vision problems (I’ve always been blind in one eye and now the other eye is giving problems). Being somewhat stubborn, giving up is not an option.

Creating drawings and paintings without any references is extremely enjoyable. You begin with nothing – in this case an empty canvas. Emus and ostriches are irresistible, silly-looking critters that always make me smile. My blank mind soon had a drawing of an emu on my blank canvas (at least I think it’s an emu).

I haven’t painted for a long time. The drawing part was easy; the painting itself will be challenging. My brushes are dusted off and ready to go!

EMU 1

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