Part 9: Creating a Critter from My Mind

Hawk was just way too dark and scary (lower image below), so I lightened both her eyes and eyelids (upper image ). I also tried a muted orange color on her lower eyelids, which seems to suit her beautifully.

BUT! Now, the color of her beak looks totally wrong. The following short lesson in color theory explains the problem:

  1. Alizarin Crimson (a red) contains a wee bit of blue and was used to mix the beak colors (when mixed together, red and blue create purple).
  2. Most of her fur/feather colors are mixed with yellow. Yellow and purple are complementary colors and when placed beside one another, both appear brighter.
  3. The beak now looks a yucky purple/pink and sticks out like a sore thumb (pun intended). The beak’s shadow sections demonstrate the “purple problem”.

Thankfully, painting with acrylics is like putting on makeup – super fast and easy to change.

I have authored several lessons on painting. These two are FREE until Sept 12, 2017:

Painting Supplies for Beginners: Selecting painting surfaces, brushes, soap, palette knives, palettes, and paints

https://www.drawspace.com/lessons/1431/overview/painting-supplies-for-beginners

Color Theory for Beginners: Introduction to the fundamentals of color theory for painters.

https://www.drawspace.com/lessons/1438/overview/color-theory-for-beginners

blog2.jpg

Part 3: Creating a Critter from My Mind

Creating an artwork from your imagination is like driving a car in a foreign country without a destination – you never know where you’re going to end up.

My background colors have already changed! The old fur (feather) colors were too similar to the previous background. By adding a little green, the fur stands out better.

Experienced artists have their favorite brushes and techniques for painting fur. I love my liners (scrip liners) – they hold lots of thinned paint and can make lines that begin wide and taper off to points. Simply apply pressure to the brush when you start the line and gradually ease off until the lines ends at a point. If your painting is small, rotate the canvas so you’re always using only sideways and downward strokes.

3.jpg

%d bloggers like this: