Part 9: Creating a Critter from My Mind

Hawk was just way too dark and scary (lower image below), so I lightened both her eyes and eyelids (upper image ). I also tried a muted orange color on her lower eyelids, which seems to suit her beautifully.

BUT! Now, the color of her beak looks totally wrong. The following short lesson in color theory explains the problem:

  1. Alizarin Crimson (a red) contains a wee bit of blue and was used to mix the beak colors (when mixed together, red and blue create purple).
  2. Most of her fur/feather colors are mixed with yellow. Yellow and purple are complementary colors and when placed beside one another, both appear brighter.
  3. The beak now looks a yucky purple/pink and sticks out like a sore thumb (pun intended). The beak’s shadow sections demonstrate the “purple problem”.

Thankfully, painting with acrylics is like putting on makeup – super fast and easy to change.

I have authored several lessons on painting. These two are FREE until Sept 12, 2017:

Painting Supplies for Beginners: Selecting painting surfaces, brushes, soap, palette knives, palettes, and paints

https://www.drawspace.com/lessons/1431/overview/painting-supplies-for-beginners

Color Theory for Beginners: Introduction to the fundamentals of color theory for painters.

https://www.drawspace.com/lessons/1438/overview/color-theory-for-beginners

blog2.jpg

About Brenda Hoddinott
Award-winning artist and author; illustrator, art educator, curriculum designer, co-owner of Drawspace.com, owner of Drawspace Publishing, and retired forensic artist Brenda has developed art curricula and taught multidisciplinary arts since 1980. During her 25-year career as a forensic artist, Brenda worked with diverse criminal investigative agencies including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canadian Department of National Defense, private investigative agencies, and municipal police departments. Brenda and her partner John live in the suburbs of Halifax, Nova Scotia with their two SPCA rescue dogs: Timber the Huskador and Katie the Pitweiler. Their blended human family includes five adult children and two grandchildren. Books by Brenda Hoddinott include: 2012: Introduction to Contour Lines (Drawspace Publishing) 2012: Introduction to Drawing (Drawspace Publishing) 2011: Illustrated Dictionary of Art-Related Terms (Drawspace Publishing) 2010: Getting Started with Drawing (Drawspace Publishing) 2004: The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People Illustrated (Alpha Books) 2003: Drawing for Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: