Back to Painting: Part 7

In Back to Painting: Part 6, I used a script liner brush to paint curved lines to indicate the directions in which the fur/feathers grow on her neck.

Only dark to medium values are used at this stage. The lightest values will not be added until the entire neck is covered in dark and medium values. I’ve mixed new colors that are brighter than those used previously.

In this point, she looks like someone shaved her neck. In fact, I’ve simply established the process for adding the final shading of her neck. The “bald” sections show the base values of the skin from which the fur grows. The darkest fur is on the left further away from the light source. The lightest fur will be toward the right side of the neck.

All the fur added at the bottom and along the edges is rendered in layers from root to tip – the actual directions in which real hair and fur grow.

Dark strands of fur are added first and then one value at a time lighter strands of fur are added over top of darker values. To create the illusion of depth, lighter layers cannot entirely cover the previous layers. Sections of each previous layer must remain visible so new layers appear to be in front of the others (a basic component of perspective called overlapping).

Note that the neck becomes narrower toward the lower sections to create the illusion that her head is closer to the viewer. The rules of perspective dictate that sections of objects that are closer need to be larger than those farther away.

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Back to Painting: Part 6

In Back to Painting: Part 5, you painted lines to indicate the directions in which the fur/feathers grow on her neck. Your next goal is to paint a range of values according to a light source.

Step 1: Mix colors similar to these. (I simply mixed six values with the paint leftover from the background.)

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Step 2: Use a script liner brush to paint curved lines to indicate:

  • the directions in which the fur grows and
  • the values of the colors based on a primary light source.

The chosen light source is from the upper right and in front of the critter:

  • Dark values in the upper left neck section represent the shadow cast by her head.
  • Medium values along the middle to lower left edges represent sections in partial shadow.
  • Medium values in the upper right edge represent the shadow cast by the fur on the right side her face. Fur is somewhat transparent, so this shadow is not as dark as the one cast by her head.
  • Light values down the center of the neck and along the right edge represent sections that receive full light.
  • Medium values along lower right edge represent sections that are farther away from the light source and therefore receive less light.

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Back to Painting: Part 5

In Back to Painting: Part 4, you completed the background. Your next goal is to apply the first layer of paint to the neck. :o)

Step 1: Check your wet palette to see if you have two different values of a light yellowish color. If not, simply mix small dollops of two new colors similar to these. (White with a little dab of yellow ochre works fine.)

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Step 2: Add a couple of drops of water to each color and remix the paint until its consistency is thin and has no lumps.

Step 3: Use a small round brush or a large scriptliner brush to paint slightly curved lines that indicate the directions in which the fur/feathers grow on her neck. No need to be super fussy – this under-painting eventually gets covered with more layers of paint. Just make sure none of the white canvas is still showing through on the neck. :o)

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Back to Painting: Part 4

In Back to Painting: Part 3, you mixed colors and painted the first layer of the background. Your next goal is to finish painting the background.

Step 1: Examine your under-painting and identify colors that need to be modified. To make drastic changes to colors, mix all new colors and re-paint the background with another under-painting.

Step 2: To slightly modify a color that’s not working, you can:

  • lighten a light value with a lighter paint color (such as white).
  • darken a dark value with a darker color (such as brown).
  • tone down the intensity of a color with its complementary color (such as red if a color is too green).
  • brighten the intensity of a color with a brighter color(s) (such as more red and yellow to brighten orange).

For basic information on color theory, refer to this free lesson:

https://www.drawspace.com/lessons/1334/overview/introduction-to-color

Step 3: Complete the final painting of the background.

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