Understanding Talent Part 5

The act of drawing produces a physical reward: art.

It really doesn’t matter why you draw or who sees your drawings. Maybe you hope to one day publicly exhibit your drawings. Or, you may choose to only share them with family and friends. You also have the option of keeping them all to yourself.

Your drawings serve as a journal of your artistic journey. Have you ever thought about writing a book? Why not use your own drawings to illustrate your literary art?

You can also use your drawings to decorate your surroundings with your own personal touch. Have some of your drawings framed and hang them in your home or workspace.

Family, co-workers, and friends easily become quite fascinated by artistic creations. Don’t be surprised if they soon request some of your drawings for their own homes. Of course, this is a good time to encourage them to take up drawing themselves.

Draw in a way you really love.

Every artist seems to have a unique approach to drawing. Some love big, bold, loose drawings; while others like little tiny drawings with lots of intricate details.

Deciding which style label applies to a specific drawing is not easy. Many artists choose to not label their drawings at all. Your personal style evolves each time you attempt new and diverse methods of drawing, so keep an open mind while carefully noting which of your drawings you prefer. Styles are neither right nor wrong… they just are. With time, your style(s) develops automatically.

You have already taken the first step!

Just by reading this, you are already on your way to becoming an artist. Perceived personal limitations are not obstacles; your only challenge is making a commitment.

For most of my adult life, I have chosen to share my love of art with both children and adults by teaching art.

Whether it is your desire to learn the very basics of drawing or to improve the drawing skills you already have, my tutorials will hopefully have something of interest to you.

Art has become very accessible in recent years.

Galleries, the Internet, art books, and your own community provide vast art resources.

By carefully observing the drawings of other artists, you gain invaluable information which you can apply to your own drawings. Take time to examine and appreciate a diverse range of art and artists.

Investigate and participate in some of the wonderful drawing e-groups, where international artists share tips, critique one another’s work, and openly exchange various art techniques and resources.

Check out your local community-based educational facilities and recreational centers for drawing programs in your area. You can always benefit from drawing classes and workshops, where you’ll meet others within your community who also want to improve their drawing skills, techniques and styles.

As you uncover local art resources, you’ll meet diverse artists, and have opportunities to become involved in art groups. Many art groups organize incredible workshops, taught by prominent artists, and the camaraderie and enjoyment is well worth your time.

With an interest in self-expression, you CAN develop exceptional drawing skills.

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About Brenda Hoddinott
Award-winning artist and author; illustrator, art educator, curriculum designer, co-owner of Drawspace.com, owner of Drawspace Publishing, and retired forensic artist Brenda has developed art curricula and taught multidisciplinary arts since 1980. During her 25-year career as a forensic artist, Brenda worked with diverse criminal investigative agencies including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canadian Department of National Defense, private investigative agencies, and municipal police departments. Brenda and her partner John live in the suburbs of Halifax, Nova Scotia with their two SPCA rescue dogs: Timber the Huskador and Katie the Pitweiler. Their blended human family includes five adult children and two grandchildren. Books by Brenda Hoddinott include: 2012: Introduction to Contour Lines (Drawspace Publishing) 2012: Introduction to Drawing (Drawspace Publishing) 2011: Illustrated Dictionary of Art-Related Terms (Drawspace Publishing) 2010: Getting Started with Drawing (Drawspace Publishing) 2004: The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People Illustrated (Alpha Books) 2003: Drawing for Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc.)

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